Advantages of Metal Articles

Cool Metal Roofing Offers Solution To Rising Energy Costs

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Special cool roof paint coatings not only help residential metal roof systems closely match traditional wood shakes and expensive copper shingles, they also make these types of metal systems the most energy efficient roofing products on the market. Shown above and on the home below is Copper Patina Country Manor Shake. Click images to enlarge.
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CMS Copper Patina - Click image to enlarge.
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CMS Weathered Wood - Click image to enlarge.
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Oxford Copper Patina - Click image to enlarge.
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Oxford Weathered Wood - Click image to enlarge.

Attractive building option also reduces heat island effect, shrinks landfill deposits

Cleveland, OH – Developers and building owners are reducing sky-high cooling bills with beautiful, cool metal roof systems made from coil coated steel and aluminum.

Cool metal roofs are designed to reflect much of the sun’s light during the day. These reflective properties can also lead to a reduction in the phenomenon known as the Urban Heat Island Effect, where urban areas measure up to 12 degrees Fahrenheit warmer than their surrounding suburbs.

The coatings that give the metal roofs these cool, reflective properties are applied by a coil coater to the metal coil before it is cut and formed. The rolls of metal are unwound, cleaned, chemically treated, primed, oven cured, top coated, oven cured again, and rewound for shipment. The prepainted metal can be formed and shaped easily, even with extreme bends and folds, with no damage, loss in surface quality or beauty.

Cool metal roofs are beautiful, and to keep the most demanding consumers happy, a wide variety of styles, textures and colors are available. Advances in cool paint pigments have even allowed metal coaters to offer darker colors with high solar reflectance.

Cool metal roofing is a sustainable and attractive solution not just for reducing energy demands, but also for mitigating environmental problems like landfill volume, smog reduction and Urban Heat Islands. Tests have shown that buildings with cool metal roofs use up to 40 percent less energy for cooling than buildings without cool roofs -- and less use of air conditioning means less smog creating output from electricity suppliers.

In many cases, cool metal roofs can be applied directly over previous roofing material, saving time and reducing landfill waste. And because they are designed to withstand harsh weather conditions that destroy other types of roofing materials, including fire, durable cool metal roofs enjoy a longer life cycle with fewer tear-offs and increased cost savings.

Cool metal roofs are made from steel or aluminum that is from 25 percent to 100 percent recycled already, and are 100 percent recyclable so when finally removed, they are reclaimed – reducing the waste input to our landfills by an estimated 1.36 billion pounds per year.

For more information about cool metal roofs, visit www.coilcoatinginstitute.org and view a new Online Tutorial explaining the many benefits of this energy-saving building solution. Or, call the National Coil Coating Association at 216-241-7333.

About The National Coil Coating Association

NCCA NLThe National Coil Coating Association (NCCA) is the leading association of businesses engaged in the process of coating coiled metals. Founded in 1962, the NCCA consists of more than 100 coaters and suppliers to the coil coating process that are at the forefront of the industry. Coil coating is an automated process that permits a high degree of customized coatings to produce a cost-effective, environmentally friendly, quality product. Prepainted metals are used in a wide variety of industries including construction, appliance, transportation, automotive, HVAC and many more. For more information, contact NCCA at 216-241-7333 or email at ncca@coilcoating.org. Visit the NCCA website at coilcoating.org.

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